Wednesday, June 02, 2010

Sampling ...

The first Vermont breeding record for the Red-bellied Woodpecker was in Brattleboro in 2001. Nine years later, it is being reported throughout Vermont, and is common in Windham County. On Monday, I returned to Phyllis' marsh in Dummerston and found this pair at their nest near the road ...


My return to the marsh was specifically to observe the nest of the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. The female returns with food for her young ...


In Brattleboro, the Prairie Warbler is still singing on territory, although this pose resulted from his curiosity about my presence ...


Atop Newfane Hill this morning, the colorful birds were high in the canopy, or silent. Not to worry. It was a good morning.

Dark-eyed Juncos breed in this forest. So common around the bird feeders during the winter, it is a very different experience to encounter them singing in deep woods during the spring and summer ...


In a patch of open forest, I found this Eastern Wood-Pewee vocalizing enthusiastically between short flights for food ...


... and finally, another nondescript flycatcher went from forest edge to apple tree top, barely interrupting his enthusiastic, if unmusical, vocalization: che-bek, che-bek, che-bek, che-bek. Least Flycatcher ...


Good birding!

2 comments:

Sonnie said...

I enjoyed your shot of my old friends, Red Bellied Woodpeckers. In my old home in MD, there were usually 2 or 3 active nest holes every summer right around the house. I loved to watch them there and at the feeders. Here in NM we don't have RB Woodpeckers, although we do have several other woodpecker neighbors.

Steve Borichevsky said...

Yes, 30 years ago, when I was cutting my teeth, bird wise, you wouln't even dream of having a Red-bellied Woodpecker in Vermont. When I first came back to Atlantic North East, I was a bit surprised.

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