Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Primary Colors

Short selection of some primary colors that live in my neighborhood, and feed from the largess of my feeders - or as our British friends say - the bird table. I am sure Easterners need no introduction, but for those North Americans who are less fortunate in where they live, or for readers from elsewhere on our fragile planet, I shall introduce them. All three are males in breeding plumage (or as some prefer, alternate plumage).

Rose-breasted Grosbeak ...

Indigo Bunting ...

American Goldfinch ...

... and that's Good birding!!

6 comments:

Kim said...

Such a gorgeous array of colors you get at your feeders. I get the Americand Goldfinch, but that's it. I have to travel to get a glmpse of the Rose-breasted Grosbeak or Indigo Bunting

Kelly said...

Love those primary colors!! You're so lucky you have grosbeaks and buntings at your feeder...

dAwN said...

Beauteous pics Chris! You really should put these on Bird Photography Weekly.

I am also wondering why you are not a member of the Nature Blog network..at least I couldn't find the logo on your site..
Your blog is perfect for NBN..

deejbrown said...

Wonderful photos! Your love of birding and art shines through them!

Cindy said...

wonderful photos of the primary color birds. I especially love the blue of the indigo bunting.

Wilma said...

Hi Chris,

thanks for visiting my blog. You asked about what camera equipment I use - I have a Canon Rebel XTi with a 18-55mm wide angle/macro zoom lens and a zoom long lens too (can't remember the details of the long lens). Pretty standard, good quality amateur SLR for a quite reasonable price. I normally use the autofocus, but I take a lot of time to be sure the autofocus is focusing on the spot I want. Manual focus is hard for me with the progressive lens eyeglasses that I can't manage without. About the only times I use manual focus are from an airplane (the autofocus takes too long and I'm focused on infinity anyhow) or when I am using the long lens from a stationary position. Sometimes it is hard to get the long lens to autofocus on the spot I want!

Hope this helps you make a decision. It is fun to look at all the options.

cheers,
Wilma

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